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Colombia was the victim of VCCP, a “click a button” Ponzi scam.

After the scheme recently failed, a new kind of exit fraud emerged.

The VCCP program was a standard “click a button” technique. Investors were misled into thinking that social media manipulation produced ROI revenue, whereas in reality VCCP was just moving invested money around.

The Chinese con artists behind the “click a button” Ponzi scams typically merely take down the websites when they fail.

If the market they were after was lucrative, they would keep releasing clone app Ponzi schemes until the local investors caught on.

But in the instance of VCCP, a fresh exit-scam tactic has surfaced.

Recently, sometime last week, visitors to VCCP were welcomed with the following information:

The General Tax Administration of Colombia forbids the VCCP.

Prior discussions and correspondence between the State Tax Administration and top management of the VCCP corporation.

The firm is compelled to pay additional taxes that must be paid for it to operate effectively on behalf of all of its members.

Even though Ponzi schemes are prohibited worldwide, including in Colombia, the con artists have concocted a tale to conceal their exit scam.

The VCCP fraudsters are attempting to defraud Colombians of even more money under the pretense of collecting taxes, which is absurd in and of itself.

Investors in the VCCP are required to pay anything from 20,000 to 15.1 million COP to receive back office monies.

The exit fraud depends on trusting VCCP investors thinking there are back office monies available for withdrawal.

It is not possible to use the initial account balance for tax reasons. After paying taxes, resume your usual work.

If employee firms don’t pay their taxes on time, they’ll be fired, and their member accounts will be locked forever.

The VCCP con artists even threaten to commit tax fraud against investors who don’t pay up.

Your work income will be impacted during the freeze, and the Colombian Tax Office will be given access to your credit.

Naturally, anybody in Colombia may get in touch with the local tax authorities to confirm the threats made by VCCP are untrue. However, they rely on investors in Ponzi schemes not wishing to contact the authorities.

The following adds salt to the exit-scam wound for VCCP:

Additionally, the money in VCCP will be given to charities.

Don’t be misled. The exit scam used by VCCP has nothing to do with the Colombian government. Any further COP given will go directly into the hands of Chinese con artists.

Although the lifespan of “click a button” Ponzis are dwindling (we’re down to a week or two for most of them), they are still being produced to attract investors from new geographical areas.

Twenty-eight “click a button” app Ponzi schemes have so far been identified by BehindMLM:

COTP, which claimed that affiliates could generate trading activity by clicking a button, folded in May 2022.

Ponzi built on the EthTRX app, with the daily task component removed, failed in July 2022.

Yu Klik, who promises that pressing a button would start trading, focuses on Indonesia

KKBT, which targeted South Africa and India and claimed that pressing a button would earn cryptocurrency mining money, crashed in early June 2022.

Easy task 888, which targeted Colombia and claimed that clicking a button was related to social media manipulation (YouTube likes), crashed in July 2022.

PDF Finance, which claimed that by pressing a button, “buy data” was collected and sold to e-commerce platforms, failed in June 2022.

Shared989, which claimed that pressing a button was related to manipulating social media (YouTube likes, etc.), folded in June 2022

86FB, which falsely linked pressing a button to bet on the results of football games, crashed in April 2022.

0W886 – claimed that pressing a button would result in betting on the results of football games, collapsed in May 2022

U91, which claimed that pressing a button was equivalent to betting on the results of football games, folded in May 2022.

Pretending that pressing a button is equivalent to betting on the results of a football game is 365Ball (which has collapsed multiple already)

LLC Football, which claimed that pushing a button was equivalent to betting on the results of football games, folded in July 2022.

Parkour, which claimed that pressing a button was related to manipulating social media (YouTube likes, etc.), crashed in July 2022.

OTCAI, which claimed that affiliates could generate trading activity by pushing a button, folded in May 2022.

N9 Football, which claimed that pushing a button was equivalent to betting on the results of football games, folded in May 2022.

Tron.BI claims that an affiliate’s click on a button was related to cloud mining for TRX.

EFG Football, which falsely linked affiliates clicking a button to betting on football game results, folded in May 2022.

GP Football, which claimed that affiliates’ clicks on buttons were related to betting on football game results, folded in May 2022.

Lucky Football, which claimed that pushing a button was equivalent to betting on the results of football games, failed in May 2022.

WT91, which claimed that affiliates’ clicks on buttons were related to betting on football game results, folded in July 2022.

Mars Football, which claimed that pushing a button was equivalent to betting on football game results, folded in July 2022.

MC Football, which claimed that affiliates’ clicks on buttons were related to betting on football game results, folded in July 2022.

PerRank, which claimed that affiliates could place purchases for e-commerce partners by pressing a button, was shut down in June 2022.

Fondo Angel is an app. Ponzi crashed in July 2022 with the daily task component removed.

Zpmxcfe, which claimed that pressing a button was related to manipulating social media (YouTube likes, etc.), crashed in July 2022.

Let’s Yarn, which claimed that pressing a button would create orders on Etsy, failed in July 2022.

Big Forest, which claimed that affiliates could create orders for e-commerce partners by pressing a button, folded in July 2022.

AOL918 – claims that activating a button is related to manipulating social media

As was already mentioned, it appears that the same set of Chinese con artists created all of the app-based task Ponzi schemes.

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