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The Ponzi scam using EasyMatic has failed.

Attempts to access the EasyMatic website, which was just launched, suddenly go to “article.in.”

This shows that the Ponzi scheme’s perpetrators had connections to India.

EasyMatic was a straightforward Ponzi scam that promised daily profits of between 0.5 and 1 percent, with a 200 percent limit.

Three investment tiers of the polygon (MATIC) were invested in by affiliates:

Easy Starter: Invest 50–500 MATIC and get 0.5% interest daily.

Easy Rapid: Invest between 550 and 2500 MATIC to earn 0.75 percent daily.

Easy Rocket: Invest 2550 MATIC or more and get 1% daily.

By hiring more employees, EasyMatic affiliates may increase their daily ROI rate.

On invested MATIC, referral commissions were given out at each of the following three stages of hiring:

level 1 (affiliates that I directly recruited) – 5%

levels 2 to 3 and 3 to 2 percent

Additionally, EasyMatic matched ROI payments made to affiliates in the downline and paid down thirty tiers of recruitment:

20 percent match at level 1

10% match at level 2. (must recruit 2 affiliates)

5% match at level 3. (must recruit 3 affiliates)

match at level 4, 3 percent (must recruit 4 affiliates)

levels 5 through 10 – 2% match (must recruit 5 affiliates)

levels 11 through 20 – 1.5% match (must recruit 6 affiliates and have generated 10,000 MATIC investments by personally recruited affiliates)

levels 21 through 27 – 1% match (must maintain 6 personally recruited affiliates and have generated 50,000 MATIC investments by personally recruited affiliates)

28th level – 5% match (must maintain 6 personally recruited affiliates and have generated 65,000 MATIC investments by personally recruited affiliates)

29th level – 5% match (must maintain 6 personally recruited affiliates and have generated 80,000 MATIC investments by personally recruited affiliates)

20 percent match at level 30. (must maintain 6 personally recruited affiliates and have generated 100,000 MATIC investments by personally recruited affiliates)

On YouTube, there is robot voice marketing films from Indian EasyMatic shills that are commercial.

Additionally, administrators Lawrence Jacobs, Alan Driggers, and Brian Rhodes oversee a closed EasyMatic FaceBook community.

Rhodes was discovered by BehindMLM earlier this year when researching the Ponzi collapse of FastBNB.

Top right, Rhodes is displaying an uneasy expression.

Math proves that EasyMatic’s owner(s) stole money from the bulk of MATIC investors and promoted fraudsters like Rhodes, Driggers, and Jacobs.

It’s unknown how many EasyMatic users lost money overall or how much.

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